East Anglian Stitch Textiles
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Category Archives for Textile art

A hard day at work

 
 
 Briar stewarding at The Pond Gallery, Snape.
 
 
 
 
She had a very busy day greeting all the visitors.
 
 

 

Roots Shoots and Leaves is an Eco Textile Exhibition developed from From the Earth, which was at the Mardleybury gallery in June 2016.

Caroline and I have been working with the Upstairs Gallery and we are very pleased to have new artists taking part as well as artist from last year.  
This work by a new artist Ken Ager, his work is called Cedars.
To go with the exhibition I will be offering an indigo workshop making and using an environmentally friendly fructose vat. 

I Love a Good Poem – Libby Smith

Whilst on holiday in Shropshire earlier this year I found a lovely book of poems by Kate Innes titled “Flocks of Words” which is also the first poem in the book.  It is so beautiful and is about how the changing words that describe a landscape as it moves through the seasons fly away, migrate like birds.  It describes a naked landscape in winter and imagining “that land in spring and watching the words return” and putting them on “like fresh plumage or a newly laundered dress”.  Definite inspiration for new work.  

I love a good poem to get my creativity going and yesterday I was reminded of the work I did last year on Emily Dickinson.  I put together a book about different aspects of her life and hand embroidered part of a poem on a double layer of silk organza, a technique I was taught by Rosalind Wyatt and is based on chain stitch.  Whilst trying to master the technique Rosalind said it was not important that you could see the threads showing through from the back of the work and that also not to worry if you couldn’t read it very clearly, it is the overall impression of a handwriting, being able perhaps to pick out an occasional word and what it all might mean.  I have used different shades of grey thread to give the impression of fading.



 

Dirty Little Secrets of My Tool Box – by Tricia North

I’m currently on an alternative education MA course called TOMA in Southend, I enrolled on the course to push myself and engage my brain cells a little and its done that.  We each have the opportunity to invite an artist to come and give us a lecture and so far we have had some stonkers, Bruce Mclean, Richard Wentworth and Griselda Pollock – by now my brain is engaged and slightly aching.  I invited Hannah Leighton Boyce and she talked about her project Instruments of Industry  https://www.a-n.co.uk/reviews/instruments-of-industry-interview-with-hannah-leighton-boyce
This piece involves the artist exploring tools and finding their resting pitch and making a music score from the results.  Being very process driven, the discussion around tools really got that brain thinking again and I started looking at what is really going on with my tools when I’m not there.  I used my kids digital microscope to start examining them and uncovered a secret world of colour and texture I never knew about.
The working surfaces were pitted and scored which, combined with the texture of the surface, created a scarred landscape worthy of Star Trek and contained spills, drips and oversprays of colour that reflects my clumsiness but created jewels and highlights that any happy accident would be extremely proud.
Hannah Leighton Boyce  – Tools of Industry


My scissors


My hammer

My metal ruler


A long walk

Colin, dog and I have come to spend a week in Northumberland to walk the Hadrian’s Wall path.  We took the Metro to Wallsend where the path begins and the first day’s walking followed the Tyne into the centre of Newcastle.  We passed a sign pointing towards Rome, 1,110 miles away, the footings which are all that is left of a Roman bath house, and warnings not to step onto the river bank as it is still polluted from the industrial waste which made the Victorian industrialists of Newcastle rich.
As we looked across the Tyne we could see the old flour mill which is now the Baltic  Centre for Contemporary Art, then to our right upstream, the seven bridges crossing the Tyne appeared, one by one, beginning with the newest, the Gateshead  Millennium Bridge which tilts and looks like a large blinking eye, then farther along the bank, the Tyne bridge which is home to a large group of  kittiwakes, the furthest inland nesting colony in the world, and what a mess they make!  We watched the birds fly around and perch on the nests which they have built on the metal struts of the bridge.
There were a couple of empty benches nearby and we turned to sit on them. I noticed that they had been made to mark the hundredth anniversary of World War I.   I photographed them because it reminded me of our EAST  “Between the Lines” project.  Shown on the back rest of the bench the iconic figures of soldiers rendered in black metal, barbed wire and bright red poppies. Under each arm rest are black helmets and a dedication. 
 
Another memorable piece of public art!
 
 
 
 

 
 

A Delightful Course

I recently attended several courses with the tutor Amanda Clayton who lives in Stafford. 
We only worked in sheer and translucent fabrics in natural colours.  She introduced us to at least ten different fabrics including crepoline, mousseline and pineapple cloth.  We were encouraged to use at least eight different types of thread in neutral colours all supplied by Amanda for us to try.
After twenty-five years of stitching I learned so much from this very generous tutor and lovely person.

Margaret Talbot



Textile Art based on Morocco

In April we had a lovely holiday in Morocco, We were in Marrakesh as well as the low Atlas mountains.

Here we are in the dyers souk in Marrakesh.
I loved the Islamic patterns and thought they could be useful inspiration for an exhibition coming up next year Kaleidoscope.
I started printing, this is acrylic on fabric to try out patterns. These results were good
I like to use naturally dyed fabric as I like the subtle colours and the sense of tradition but for this project brighter colours would be needed. So I have been experimenting with natural pigments, Many of these come from Morocco.
Unfortunately printing with these colours didn’t work as well, I have mixed the pigments, or I should say ground the pigments into soya milk and guar gum, I also tried gum tragacantha. I should say that prints with stencils and thermo fax screens did work well. This is a print on fabric dyed with avocado skins and pits, that has been soaked in soya milk.
However I like the faded look, I normally concentrate on organic patterns and asymmetric shapes so this is a new departure.  This is the same print as above with satin stitch with some areas only partially stitched, I hope to create a faded, partially disintegrated look. This is a sample, I will be developing it into a new piece in the next few weeks or months. I will do another posting when it is finished so you can see.  

Amanda Clayton’s talk

On 29th April I visited the Colchester and Colne branch of The Embroiderers’  Guild  to hear Amanda Clayton’s talk My blue suitcase and as I sat on the train on my way home l looked at an everyday item that I had carried with me all day – my train ticket. 



Next morning, in my workroom, I decided I would try to add odd items from my snippets box to make something unique which I could  add to my ideas book.
The ticket was too shiny so I gave it a good rub with some emery paper and painted it with cold tea. In the box I found a piece of calico from the edge of an unsuccessful collagraph print and some pieces of organdie.  I worked two parallel lines of running stitch along the edge of the calico and ruched it up slightly so it fitted on the ticket and I tore the organdie in two and frayed it.  I held the fabric on the ticket with a line of open chain stitch using an un-dyed linen thread.  I thought the open chain stitch looked a bit like the railway lines but the line was broken to represent the fractured return journey.
I further enhanced the ticket with some strands of bronze thread, a couple of daisies from a ribbon and a button which hid the ticket logo – just a few hours playing which will help me to remember an inspiring  Saturday morning.

Hurry; you have just got time to visit!

JOSEF FRANK – PATTERNS – FURNITURE – PAINTING

Room setting with at least 7 different prints


You have just got time to see this exhibition at the Fashion and Textiles Museum in London http://www.ftmlondon.org/ftm-exhibitions/josef-frank-patterns-furniture-painting/ as it ends on May 7th but I would recommend you do so.  I came out feeling refreshed and rejuvenated by the colours and designs of Josef Frank’s work.


The work of the designer and artist Josef Frank (1885-1967) is shown in the first-ever UK exhibition of his textiles. The Austrian-born architect moved to Sweden in 1933, where he developed his colourful brand of modernism, working with Estrid Ericson on furniture, glassware, lighting and interior design ideas. Together they redefined what is regarded as Swedish Modern. This exhibition in association with Millesgården, Stockholm highlights Frank’s vibrant fabric designs for Svenskt Tenn alongside a number of his previously unknown watercolours.

Huge colourful pink and orange flowers burst across the wall as you enter the show, and it’s difficult not to smile.
Following through one is encompassed by large drapes of colourful and exciting colour and pattern.

Close up all the detail can be seen.

Josef Frank was a mid century architect, furniture designer and fabric print designer. This show focuses on Joseph’s prints, along with a selection of his watercolours upstairs. When Frank retired he turned to watercolour painting instead. These were not so much to my taste; a contrast to the rich flora and fauna of his textiles, but from here a dramatic view of the prints below.
Images courtesy of The Fashion and Textiles Museum


Changing Direction

Looking for a change of direction I have been visiting some exhibitions lately in the hope of finding inspiration.

A recent visit to the NCCD at Sleaford with Lorna where we met up with Mary Sleigh to see two exhibitions, the first of some wonderful weavings. Sadly no photography was allowed so no pictures here to show you. The second exhibition – ‘Soft Engineering: Textiles Taking Shape’ showed some wonderful skill and artistry, Alison Ellen’s creative knitting, Ann Richard’s wonderful woven Jewellery, although maybe better described as body sculpture. Ann uses a variety of mediums in her pieces metal, silk,linen and polyester to name but a few. She uses the different way each material reacts to wet finishing to create the twisted, pleated finish. Deidre Woods weavings, using a narrow loom to weave braid-like pieces which she then combines with folding to make complex forms.

My second outing was to attend Jane Callender’s book launch at the Warner Textile Archive in Braintree. Jane is an acknowledged expert on Indigo and Shibori dyeing. I have been making some very inexpert attempts at Shibori recently, particularly attending a class with Jude Kingshott using stitched Shibori on previously Procion dyed fabric which is then overdyed with Indigo, and find myself fascinated by the technique. So maybe this is the way to go.

The final image here is pole wrapped Shibori on fabric pre-dyed with Pottasium Permanganate and then Indigo.