East Anglian Stitch Textiles
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Category Archives for Textile art

Making our Marks

One of the strengths of EAST as a group is the fact that we make time to play , experiment and generally immerse ourselves in our practice.

We recently had a sketchbook development session with textile artist Amanda Hislop, who was our guest tutor for the day.

We experimented with mark-making using a host of different media and textures, playing with positive and negative spaces, ending up with plenty of inspirational material for our sketchbooks.

Amanda has many small sketchbooks that she makes from folding paper, that she showed us the process of. These are so compact that they can be taken out and about in a pocket with a minimal sketching kit of a few well-chosen implements to draw with.

I’ll let the images speak for themselves!

dangerous pockets

Dangerous Pockets Project Exhibition – A Community Art Collaboration by Paula MacGregor in Ipswich

This exhibition is currently on show in Ipswich at The Whistler Gallery in The Jerwood Dance Centre on the Waterfront, until 29th February and I thoroughly recommend seeing it.
Paula MacGregor, the community artist explains;
” I read a poem called ‘Dangerous Coats’ by Sharon Owens, it is a light-hearted poem that caught my imagination – and so the Dangerous Pockets Project was born. I asked people to send me pockets they had made; I threaded them onto red cords and arranged for them to tour England – and possibly beyond. Why a red cord – it is symbolic of the joining together of women all over the world”.

Dangerous Coats by Sharon Owens

Someone clever once said
Women were not allowed pockets
In case they carried leaflets
To spread sedition
Which means unrest
To you and me
A grandiose word
For common sense
Fairness
Kindness
Equality
So ladies, start sewing
Dangerous coats
Made of pockets & sedition

The Dangerous Pockets Project brought people together of all ages – helping to break social isolation, as well as encouraging conversation about matters of health, fairness and general well being. Many people said making the pockets was cathartic and therapeutic – helping them work through recent surgery and unpleasant treatments, and issues from their past. Others have said the pockets awakened their creativity – some people become a bit addicted and made several!

Ellen’s Legacy – Slow Stitched Books
Paula has just launched a new community project that has been dedicated to her dear friend and fellow artist Ellen Devall. Ellen was a dedicated member of E.A.S.T. for 7 years , who passed away in the hospice whilst holding Paula’s hand, on 25th June 2019
Paula made Ellen an unconditional promise to keep her work going.
To find out more about this project details are on Paula’s website and on Facebook.
http://www.paulamacgregor.com/dangerous-pockets-project.html

Some of the Dangerous Pockets in The Whistler Gallery
Courtauld weaving

Woven into the Courtauld exhibition

In May 2019, EAST members held a drop-in weaving workshop at Braintree District Museum as part of the Warner Textile Fair. We set up three sets of warps and asked visitors to weave fabric and threads using the colours green, white and purple. These were the colours associated with the Suffragettes and the weavings were a commemoration of three Courtauld women who strongly believed in women’s rights over 100 years ago.

Now the story of these women are part of a much wider exhibition about the family open at Braintree District Museum (until 30 May 2020). The main narrative is the story of a family who escaped persecution as European refugees, came to Britain and eventually developed a major textile industry. The Courtauld’s brought prosperity through employment to Essex and Suffolk, including Braintree, in the nineteenth century. The family were also major art collectors, forming the foundation of the now famous Courtauld Gallery in London and supporters of this exhibition in Braintree.

This is just an introduction to the three women commemorated by the EAST led weaving – to find out more you need to visit the Museum.

Katherine Mina Courtauld (1858-1935) – oil on canvas

Katherine Mina Courtauld (1858-1935), was the eldest daughter of George Coutauld III. She was a farmer, parish councillor and Secretary of the North West Essex branch of the National Union of women’s Suffrage Societies. On the 1911 census she wrote (in red, to ensure her feelings were known) how she strongly resented being denied the privilege of parliamentary franchise despite being a householder and ratepayer. Katherine was also instrumental in the establishment of the Women’s Land Army during WWI.

Catherine Courtauld (1878-1972) was another campaigner for women’s right to vote. She designed posters which were used by the Suffrage Atelier – a collective that created propaganda for the Votes for Woman campaign. Incidentally, she and her husband were also later responsible for the saving and restoring of the Cutty Sark for the nation.

The last of these three remarkable women was Dr Elizabeth Courtauld (1867-1947) who qualified as a doctor as early as 1901. As principal anaesthetist she worked at the largest British voluntary hospital on the Western Front during WWI – the only one run by women (Royaumont Hospital). She spent most of her working life at a hospital in Bagalore, India.

The EAST hanging from the 2019 Warner Textile Fair – produced by visitors to our drop in workshop and now on display at Braintree District Museum
(apologies for the quality of the photo)

Although the EAST hanging is just a very tiny part of this major exhibition it is nice to think that we honoured women who went against the grain, who stood up for their beliefs and enabled us, in this modern age, to follow our own dreams. However there are many more women’s stories – and plenty of stories of Courtauld men too – in the main display.

I would highly recommend Courtaulds: Origins, Innovations, Family (1816-1982) for a fascinating look at one family’s impact on a country and a county or for anyone with an interest in social history or the history of textile innovation. The display looks at the Courtaulds as inventors, explorers and people with creative vision. There is also a rare chance to see some original Gaugin etchings – which have been lent by The Courtauld Gallery. Gaugin is known for his colourful work so it is interesting to see close up, his work in a very different medium.

Entrance to the exhibition and the rest of the Museum is only £4 for adults (with concessions for seniors and children – under 5s free) – open Tuesday to Saturdays but check their website for more details – www.braintreemuseum.co.uk and look out for their walks, talks and other events on social media.

Janette

Organic Subversive

EAST members recently enjoyed a creative Saturday with artist and textile designer Vinny Stapley, exploring organic forms while studying a magnificent, dramatically-lit large still-life.

With the focus on observation, we warmed up with three exercises: drawing with our non-dominant hand; drawing not looking at the paper and drawing with the charcoal at the end of a long stick.

Our inhibitions freed, we went on to produce, from our observations of the Henri Rousseau-like centre display, ‘moments’ captured from areas we chose to use. There was a twist to how we did this, though: we spent about eight minutes at each of the 14 positions around the centre-piece, each time using a different medium before moving on to the next.

After lunch we further studied the cornucopia of organic forms by concentrating our focus on a particular part and zooming in on it, sometimes producing quite abstract results.

Group work, in threes/ fours, then took the form of collaborating to make a 3D piece.

Throughout the day we had group critiques, when it was interesting to see what other members made of the various elements that made up this fun workshop.

We’ve invited another guest artist/tutor for a workshop day with us in February 2020. Watch this space for our next adventure …

Curious

I have begun a new sketchbook using the word curious as the inspiration

Does this image make you curious?

How about this one?

New work

It’s gone to my head

Weekend with Diane Bates.

Retracing my great-grandfathers journey with his herds of cattle and sheep, and his family from the Isle of Coll to Glasgoand. Also my grandfathers journey from Glasgow to Suffolk, on a train with all his stock machinery and family created a wonder purse of inspiration for this inspiring weekend.

Liz Hammond

Copper 7

Commissioned piece for a 7yr wedding anniversay for a sexual health doctor. Seven years is copper so the copper 7 IUD coil was inspiration.

qrf

Inspired by colour

Although not a textile exhibition – certainly one to inspire. Previous EAST member Di Christopher did some beautiful work based on Chihuly some years ago. These are some images of Chihuly’s work from his current exhibition at Kew Gardens.

Chihuly: Reflections on Nature – continues until 27 October 2019.

Working on Diane Bates workshop

Working on my life’s journey in maps of all the places I have lived, there’s far more of the early years as my mother dearly loved a move. Her idea of a fun Sunday afternoon trip out was looking round building site, before health and safety made builders screen them off. I think there will be more to come as I map all the walks I used to do with my friend Libby.

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