East Anglian Stitch Textiles
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Working on Diane Bates workshop

Working on my life’s journey in maps of all the places I have lived, there’s far more of the early years as my mother dearly loved a move. Her idea of a fun Sunday afternoon trip out was looking round building site, before health and safety made builders screen them off. I think there will be more to come as I map all the walks I used to do with my friend Libby.

Delightful Dior, Part 2

Janette has written such a descriptive passage about our trip to the Christian Dior exhibition that she hasn’t left much for me to mention.  Therefore, I shall have to elaborate on the rooms which interested me the most.

At the beginning of the exhibition, amongst the photographs of the young Dior with his family, friends and his colleagues at the first Paris Fashion House, was a colourful seed catalogue dated 1905. This was placed here to show how influential gardens were to some of Dior’s designs which we saw in one of the rooms that took my breath away as we entered it. Here the ceiling, walls, and occasionally floor, was decked out with paper flowers, which must have taken hours, not only to display, but make in the first place.  White, pale blue and green l.e.d. lighting placed amongst the flowers enhanced the display.   This was called the Garden Room and many of the outfits  were obviously inspired by plants.

Lily of the Valley was said to have been one of Christian Dior’s favourite flowers and the floor around the dress of that name was festooned with paper examples of the growing plant.

The other room which particularly appealed to me showed the work of the Ateliers.  This was set out a little like that in the Alexander McQueen exhibition, in that case entitled  “The Cabinet of Curiosities”, where the items were shown in staging which reached right up to the ceiling. In the Dior exhibition the toile were displayed in compartments which the skilful placement of mirrors made to appear to reach the ceiling.  These were the first patterns for the clothes, cut from cotton, indicating where the seams, darts etc. were required to shape the garment.

I particularly loved this example of the Ateliers’ work which, in its final form, was to have embroidery on the collar and pockets. That design was drawn  on paper and tacked into position on the garment.

In the room depicting how different world cultures had influenced the designers, I couldn’t resist snapping this picture of an outfit by Maria Grazia Chiuri, the latest director at Dior, made for the Spring Collection 2019.

I was drawn to all the hand-stitching which made up the design around the lower part of the skirt (right).

As we left the Ateliers room we passed into a dark gallery which on one side displayed magazine covers bearing images of models in Dior gowns but opposite it was the Diorama.

This display was arranged in coloured sections, like a rainbow, beginning with silver and progressing through to midnight blue.  Each section held a full-sized piece of clothing surrounded by shoes, handbags, hats and doll-sized examples of dresses or coats as well as decoupaged illustrations of the collection.  In the red area can be seen the outfit which I had pictured in the Ateliers gallery. Brilliant!

As anyone who knows Janette and I would rightly say, we are not “fashionistas”, but for both of us, this exhibition far exceeded expectations and I would urge you to check out the V&A website, if you’re unable  to visit before the end of the month, to see these stunning images of “Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams”.

detail of Le Bal des Artistes

Delightful Dior

detail of Le Bal des Artistes
Detail of dress by John Galiano (b.1960)

I may have left visiting ‘Christian Dior: Designers of Dreams’ at the V&A Museum to the last few weeks, but for me the timing was absolutely perfect. With no E.A.S.T deadlines, and approval from my supervisor that my university research was coming together well, planning a day off with a good friend (and fellow E.A.S.Tie, Susan) was just perfect. This was not an exhibition where I needed to make notes; initially I was not even going to get my camera out. Instead I decided I could just relax and admire the work on display. And event though we had it on good authority (from our group mentor, Anthea) that this was an exhibition well worth seeing, it definitely exceeded my expectations.

The display began with an introduction to Christian Dior himself, and the ‘New Look’ he first became famous for. Surrounding his classic version were ‘updates’ by the five other artistic directors that came after him – Yves Saint-Laurent, Marc Bohan, Gianfranco Ferro, Raf Simons and Maria Grazia Chiuri. All through the display there was a combination of work from these six designers – sharing similar themes but often in very different ways. Yet despite their differences, elements of the original Christian Dior ‘style’ could often still be seen.

Inspired by historical costume
One of my favourite pieces was the ’18th century’ style jacket (right)
– a piece by Raf Simons (b.1968)

One of the first sections we came to was a selection of work inspired by history (see above) – in particular several items inspired by eighteenth-century court dress. I have written a little more about the ‘history’ display of this exhibition in my own personal blog, ‘Artistic Threads‘.

The embroidery on this ‘Indian’ inspired gown was exquisite – but so difficult to photograph.


Though this ‘Egyptian’ theme gown was a little bizarre, I just loved the way the cloth was decorated. Though the original item is decorated with snake skin, I could imagine a similar effect with modern textile techniques.

Other areas focused on themes such as ‘travel’ (see above) and ‘nature’ (or was it ‘floral’?). This second room, as well as some stunning dresses, included a backdrop of the most amazing paper flowers (see below).

Paper flowers – showing the incredible skill/creativity of the V&A display team.

One of the highlights was the diorama.  A display filled with a rainbow of elements – accessories (hats, shoes, jewellery) and related aspects of design – fashion illustration and miniature versions of the gowns – moving seamlessly from one colour palette to another.  

Another room focused on the creation of the garments – almost entirely in white this room was a cabinet of toiles (see below).

Toiles on display

The display ended with the most fantastic ball room.  Not only a room full of the most fantastic gowns and accessories, but again the way everything was displayed  added an extra special dimension.  Using lighting techniques, film, and scent no photograph can do this particular room justice.  I have included just a couple of items from the display below.

From the Ball Room display

This was an exhibition that was well worth waiting for.  As well as there being some absolutely beautiful garments on display, I felt it also gave an real insight into haute couture and the work involved in putting together a collection.  Many of the pieces had the most exquisite decoration – embroidery and beadwork was much in evidence.  It may have Dior’s name on the door, but the creative team work was much in evidence.

However for me, I came away not just with admiration for the House of Dior and their amazing work, but also the people at the V&A Museum – their creative team should also be applauded for putting together a really interesting, beautiful and inspiring display.

Tollesbury Marshes

Power of Stitch at Snape

Tollesbury Marshes

E.A.S.T is excited to take Power of Stitch to the Pond Gallery at Snape Maltings.

GEAR

Under one ‘umbrella’ theme, the works in our latest exhibition are unified by its title, but are as varied as you might hope to find in terms of the individual artists’ approach, focus of subject matter, choices of materials and techniques.

Shibori 11

The few images here are just to whet your appetite … as a group of fourteen textile artists with diverse styles and ways of expressing our creative passions, we believe there is something to capture the imagination of most people who enjoy visual art.

A Place to Live

A feast for the eyes, Power of Stitch will be stewarded at Snape by E.A.S.T artists who will be happy to tell you more about the art works and our group.

Encounter
Encounter detail

So, whether you’re ready for your senses to be stimulated, your thoughts provoked, or you’d just like to spend time looking at some original works of art, we’ll be pleased to welcome you at the Pond Gallery from Thursday 4 July to Wednesday 10 July, 10 am till 5 pm.

Power of Stitch on show

On Tuesday a group of stitchers from the Suffolk West branch of the Embroiderers’ Guild journeyed to Braintree to be conducted around the Power of Stitch exhibition by myself and Melinda.

Before the tour began Melinda described a little about how the group worked, how we present our work to each other and the support we gain from Anthea, our mentor.

A general view of the gallery with Lynda’s exhibit in the foreground

We then gave everyone time to wander around the exhibition and ask specific questions about the work on display. 

We were also able to open the cabinet and remove our sketch/ideas books for everyone to peruse, although sometimes it was difficult to remember exactly how we’d achieved a design and the thought process behind it.

The sketch/ideas books

After all the hard work completing our exhibits and preparing them for display it was a real reward to share the Power of Stitch exhibition with such an admiring audience.

Japanese dyeing

Last month I was in the Kensington area of London with about 40 minutes to spare between appointments.  What better place to visit than the Victoria and Albert Museum.  There just happened to be an exhibition of natural dyeing in the Japanese Gallery with displays relating to one man’s search for lost techniques. 

Videos not only showed some of the dyeing processes but also explained about some of the ceremonies that related to the practice – including the making of dyed paper flowers (see below).

Sadly the display has gone now and my images do not do it justice, but it just shows how even a half hour visit can be quite inspiring.

Adding a little minimal stitching

Spending a few days adding a little minimal stitching to (hopefully) enhance my large Shibori piece. Proving a pain in more than one way as I’m suffering with a really painful thumb joint which makes pulling the needle through excruciating so it’s been going very slowly. Hoping I’ve finished but looking at the pic just wondering if I need more.

Carol Dixon
Melinda

Ready to go!

EAST BLOG January 2019
By Melinda
 
Over the years as a textile tutor and mentor I have said too many times to count, “the work is not finished till the framing / presentation is dealt with”
My new motto is the work is not finished until the packaging and means of transportation are sorted!
Wow what a week. I always knew it would be a bit of a mission to be producing my work for EAST in one country and exhibiting it in another. Yes, I could have made it easy for myself and worked “small” or at least a little smaller but my creative self would not allow me to be dictated by such practical matters as how to get the work back to the UK. At least the smaller pieces can travel with me as hand luggage
And so, the normal excitement of collecting my work from the framer was slightly overshadowed by the reality that it was now that delivery to the UK had to be dealt with. After several days and many phone calls and running around (not aided by a nasty flu virus), we are ready for collection. DHL is supposedly appearing at my little house in the North of Israel on Sunday and as if by magic my work should be in Chelmsford ready for me to bring to the next EAST meeting.
A million things can still go wrong but I am at least fairly confident that the many layers of bubble, shrink plastic and this amazing water tight plastic sheeting that a cousin sourced for me, will re-define the meaning of “proper packaging.”
 
I have done my best. It will probably take as many days to unwrap all the layers, but only then will I truly give a sigh of relief and think finished! Fingers crossed please!

Ready and waiting for collection

 

Mark Making on Silk Organza

Mark making on silk organza using procion dyes and Manutex with bits of garden hose, an old umbrella handle, edge of a credit card, etc.  Overlaying and arranging till a winter landscape emerges – a few spare hours playing with fabric.

Alchemy with Natural Dyes

Students on my workshop [Jenny Leslie] worked very  hard yesterday. We used 3 natural dyes, brasil wood, buckthorn bark and woad.

the buckthorn bark vat
brasil wood vat
After dyes some fabric we over dyed with woad and applied after baths to get a very good range of colours.
 
These are the students results aren’t they great.
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