East Anglian Stitch Textiles
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All posts by Jenny Leslie

Alchemy with Natural Dyes

Students on my workshop [Jenny Leslie] worked very  hard yesterday. We used 3 natural dyes, brasil wood, buckthorn bark and woad.

the buckthorn bark vat
brasil wood vat
After dyes some fabric we over dyed with woad and applied after baths to get a very good range of colours.
 
These are the students results aren’t they great.

Alice Fox

The ERTF conference last Saturday was right up my street. Alice Fox talked about her work. I really like the way she concentrates on her theme, often the coastline and really develops it, and of course her work is very environmentally friendly. I hope to use ideas from the talk and workshop in my future work for East.

  This is my work from the mini workshop, we were all given four pieces of paper and we stitched them together, it was surprising how many different small works we made.

For my work for The Power of Stitch I am trying to depict the power of nature through volcanic activity, so I wanted a bright red. A bright red is not easy to get with natural dyeing, but fermentation dyeing works well with madder.
I put 100 grams of ground madder in a 4 pint plastic bottle and filled nearly to the top with water.
Every day I removed the lid to let any gases out and gave it a good shake. Madder works better in a high PH and fermentation tends to make the dye acidic so after a week I added a teaspoon of slaked lime.

After 3 weeks I put the liquid into a dye vat and added wetted out fabric. This is a silk cotton mix fabric. I soaked it in the dye vat for a day and this is the result, just what I wanted.

I had a lovely walk first thing this morning, before the heat of the day, I was looking for Queens Anne’s Lace [or wild carrot] and Golden Rod they both grow in the hedge rows. The Queens Anne’s Lace was ready but the Golden Rod was not.

The Golden Rod will be ready soon. Here is the Queen Annes lace I gathered ready to make a dye bath.
The flower heads and a few leaves were simmered not boiled for about an hour, then the liquid was strained before adding mordanted the fabric. Below is the silk cotton mix that is the end result
Its a lovely greeny yellow.
Jenny Leslie

My inspiration for our next East exhibition The Power of Stitch comes from a trip in 2016 to Yellowstone Park USA, from that trip I have got very interested in the Power of Nature and how to interpret it through Stitch. I am sure you will have seen Volcanoes erupting recently, my ideas have morphed into lava flows very hot and cold.

Another inspiration has been shibori, which I do with natural dyes and then leave it to dry so all the creases and wrinkles stay put.
These are supposed to look like tree stumps or branches.
and this is a shibori vase.
So I have been trying to interpret lava with natural dyes and shibori. Its not easy to get a strong red with natural dyes, in the picture you will see fabric that is a silk cotton mix dyed with madder and also quite a lot of greys and blacks that I got by mixing log wood with iron and tannine.

At the moment these pieces of fabric are just placed together, so I shall be playing with them and rearranging them, but there are more things to try, I hope to get a 3D effect so watch this space! 

In May I posted pictures on our trip to Morocco and samples and ideas for a textile piece based on the wonderful Islamic tiles there. I was experimenting with natural pigments that can be found in the souks in Marrakesh.
So after 6 months I have finally finished two pieces of work block printed with natural pigments and then stitched in places… I wanted to suggest a gradual disintegrating of these ancient patterns.  The top piece is almost twice the size of the second.

This one is a detail.

Jenny’s experiments with fermentation dyeing.
 I think this must be the slowest form of dyeing as it is done cold. I started with weld which wasn’t very successful, but red cabbage has been very exciting.
I chopped up a quarter of a red cabbage very small and put it in a clean plastic milk bottle with the lid on. I shook it 3 times a day and let out the gasses, it was kept in the dark and after 4 days this was the result.

I know that red cabbage is very sensitive to the PH, so I tried painting the silk with washing soda, that is an alkaline ph.

This was quite a startling colour, and so far after a month it hasn’t changed. so then I tried lemon juice, this goes a very pretty pink, but it did tend to rinse out.

Iron water made from [ferrous sulphate] turn the silk blue and does seem colour fast at the moment.

finally I did a black berry leaf print, not such a good result.

I shall have to see how the colour lasts, red cabbage is notoriously good at fading, the idea is that the fermentation will help the colour to stay.
  Now I have started 2 more one with buckthorn bark, I have kept the PH high by adding slaked lime, this took much longer about 3 weeks but I am pleased with the red colour.

I now have a birch bark vat going, it is supposed to make pink, but after nearly 3 weeks I am not sure yet.

Textile Art based on Morocco

In April we had a lovely holiday in Morocco, We were in Marrakesh as well as the low Atlas mountains.

Here we are in the dyers souk in Marrakesh.
I loved the Islamic patterns and thought they could be useful inspiration for an exhibition coming up next year Kaleidoscope.
I started printing, this is acrylic on fabric to try out patterns. These results were good
I like to use naturally dyed fabric as I like the subtle colours and the sense of tradition but for this project brighter colours would be needed. So I have been experimenting with natural pigments, Many of these come from Morocco.
Unfortunately printing with these colours didn’t work as well, I have mixed the pigments, or I should say ground the pigments into soya milk and guar gum, I also tried gum tragacantha. I should say that prints with stencils and thermo fax screens did work well. This is a print on fabric dyed with avocado skins and pits, that has been soaked in soya milk.
However I like the faded look, I normally concentrate on organic patterns and asymmetric shapes so this is a new departure.  This is the same print as above with satin stitch with some areas only partially stitched, I hope to create a faded, partially disintegrated look. This is a sample, I will be developing it into a new piece in the next few weeks or months. I will do another posting when it is finished so you can see.  

From the Earth an Exhibition to celebrate Ethical Textiles

Caroline Bell and I are very pleased with how the exhibition, From the Earth at Mardleybury Gallery [Datchworth SG3 6SG] has been going. The Exhibition is on for a few more days..   it closes at 4 on Saturday. The Gallery has been a very good setting for the Exhibition.

We have three guest artists, above is the work of Fabienne Dorsman Rey, who also led one of our workshops at Art Van Go. We also have work by the India Flint who I feel is the initiator of  the current re surge of interest in natural dyeing and eco leaf printing, as well as Alice Fox’s great work.
  
It has been great to be able to include work by some experienced UK artists above is Reef Marks by Shelley Rhodes.
There is also work by local artists and artists who are just setting out, this wonderful piece is by Rebecca Robins.
It was good to have Margaret Talbot’s Petrified Trees, East textiles were well represented.
Jenny Dean author of many books and very experienced natural dyer gave us a very encouraging introduction at the Private View last Friday.